The glow sticks may be losing their, well, glow, but Late Of The Pier, the only four teenagers from Castle Donington who don’t wear denim, are poised to Party Like It’s 1989 with their synthetic dance music, futurist fringes, rave NRG and alienation effect. They formed in 2003, inspired by Sam Dust’s dad, a former ’80s electro musician from such asymmetrical nonentities as My Dog Has No Nose and Smokey & The Fall – the Human League are not known to have lost a wink of sleep over either.

They’ve been described as “music to have asthma to”, probably not a reference to the particles of Dust in the ionosphere when he sings, and their debut single Space And The Woods was a strikingly Numan-esque affair, from the I’m-an-android drone-vox and simply mesmerising one-finger synth melody to the cold intoning of the lyric (“Suicide’s in my blood” – kids and their death fixation, eh?). It makes you feel as if not only nu rave but also romo were more than just media fictions, even if it does posit LOTP as the Hollies to the Bravery’s Beatles. The intriguingly titled Flipside Heartbeat, Flicker, Line, was more extraordinary still, while newer tracks such as The Bears Are Coming suggest an Eno-esque, even Zappa-esque intelligence, playfulness and strangeness. No, not Steve Strange, although now you mention it…

Bathroom Gurgle, their next single, was an equally distinctive and powerful surge of manic synth energy and was produced by mash-up maestro and Trash DJ Erol Alkan, who reckons LOTP are the most exciting band on the planet, although he doesn’t specify which planet. LOTP recently supported Jack Penate on tour, one of the weirdest mismatches since Hendrix toured with the Monkees (true story). The single’s got its own manifesto-cum-dance-manoeuvre – “So put your hands on your waistline/And move your body to the bassline/And get your hands on some cheap wine” – that probably no one except the great Simon Price, the only music journalist in London with a Day-Glo version of Travis Bickle’s Mohican, and his coterie of gorgeous ghouls will follow, but it’s a manifesto nonetheless. Despite or because of all this daftness, if LOTP carry on like this, we’ll keep feeling fascinated.

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